Politics

UK postpones Jan 1 introduction of post-Brexit checks on goods from Ireland as border talks drag on


UK postpones January 1 introduction of post-Brexit checks on goods entering Britain from Ireland as talks with EU over border dispute drag on into 2022

  • The checks on incoming goods from EU due to come into force on January 1 
  • They mainly cover food and agricultural products from island of Ireland to GB
  • They bring post-Brexit customs arrangements with bloc in line with rest of world
  •  But Brexit Minister Lord Frost said the existing arrangements would continue










The Government is to delay new controls on goods moving from the island of Ireland to Great Britain while negotiations with Brussels on the Northern Ireland Protocol continue.

The checks on incoming goods from the European Union – covering mainly food and agricultural products – are due to come into force on January 1, bringing post-Brexit customs arrangements with the bloc in line with those with the rest of world.

However, Brexit Minister Lord Frost said the existing arrangements would continue on a temporary basis for goods crossing the Irish Sea for as long as the discussions on the protocol are ongoing.

‘The Government believes that this pragmatic act of good will can help to maintain space for continued negotiations on the protocol,’ Lord Frost said in a written ministerial statement.

‘It also ensures that traders in both Ireland and Northern Ireland are not faced with further uncertainty while the protocol arrangements themselves are still under discussion.’

Brexit Minister Lord Frost said the existing arrangements would continue on a temporary basis for goods crossing the Irish Sea for as long as the discussions on the protocol are ongoing.

Brexit Minister Lord Frost said the existing arrangements would continue on a temporary basis for goods crossing the Irish Sea for as long as the discussions on the protocol are ongoing.

Leo Varadkar, Ireland's deputy prime minister, welcomed the delay as good news for Irish exporters and farmers.

Leo Varadkar, Ireland’s deputy prime minister, welcomed the delay as good news for Irish exporters and farmers.

The Government is seeking major changes to the protocol – which covers the movement of goods from Great Britain to North Ireland – arguing the checks required are damaging business and fuelling community tensions.

Britain left the EU’s single market at the beginning of 2021 but has twice delayed implementation of some post-Brexit import controls. Full customs declarations and controls are due to come into force from Jan. 1.

But Britain and the EU are still locked in talks to resolve difficulties with trading arrangements, known as the Northern Ireland Protocol, for the British province that shares a land border with EU member Ireland.

Leo Varadkar, Ireland’s deputy prime minister, welcomed the delay as good news for Irish exporters and farmers. But Jeffrey Donaldson, leader of Northern Ireland’s largest pro-British party, the Democratic Unionist Party, said the situation was unfair.

He said some checks were being imposed on goods going from Britain to Northern Ireland, harming British businesses, but the door had been left open for companies in the Republic of Ireland.

“Time to sort the Irish Sea Border between GB & NI,” he said on Twitter.




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